Archive

Monthly Archives: September 2012

Expected Harvest:

New this week:

spinach

Plus more of…

  • arugula
  • baby bok choy
  • green beans – French and yellow wax varieties
  • carrots – orange
  • garlic, hardneck – Spanish roja
  • kohlrabi
  • lettuce mix
  • mesclun
  • okra
  • onions – sweet, white and red torpedo (an oblong, red onion)
  • peppers – red, yellow, orange, and purple bell peppers
  • potatoes: dark red norland (red-skinned, white interior) or satina (yellow skin and interior)
  • radish, French breakfast
  • scallions
  • Swiss chard
  • tomatoes – cherry (a mix of red, orange, yellow, purple, and maybe even some green)
  • tomatoes – red and heirloom and paste varieties
  • turnips – hakurei (a sweet, white salad turnip)

Bonus Herbs & Other things:

  • basil
  • hot peppers including: fish, habanero, jalapeño, poblano, and anaheim peppers
  • lemon grass

Coming soon…

Our watermelon radishes are are starting to size up,  but they are still a little small for harvesting.  They should be ready soon, though… perhaps in a week or two.

Pretty soon we will have broccoli.  We’ve found a few heads here and there that were ready to pick, but the majority aren’t quite there.  Depending on how fast they grow, we might have some ready to pick for you all next week.  We also have cauliflower planted, but it usually takes a little longer than broccoli, and it seems to still be few weeks away from maturity.

We also have some fennel planted for fall harvest.  It seems to have taken longer than usual to reach harvestable size this fall, but it is finally getting close.

And, we will start digging our sweet potatoes soon.  This year we grew three varieties: Beaureguard (traditional moist, orange-fleshed variety), Bunch Porto Ricos (bronze skin with sweet, yellowish-orange interior), and Nancy Halls (a tan-skinned sweet potato with creamy yellow interior). First we dig them, then we need to cure them for at least one week to improve flavor and storability.  So, it will still be a couple of weeks until we’ll have some ready to hand out.

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Design a Logo for Colchester Farm CSA!

We are running a logo design contest and inviting the community to submit designs that represent our organization.  We are offering a $200 prize to the designer of the winning logo.  The contest is only 2 weeks long with a deadline of October 3rd.

Interested in submitting a design or know someone who may be interested?  Please visit or share with them the contest website which can be accessed from our website.

We look forward to seeing everyone’s submissions.

Expected Harvest:

New this week:

baby bok choy
hakurei turnips
Plus more of…
  • arugula
  • beets – red
  • green beans – French and yellow wax varieties
  • carrots – orange
  • garlic, hardneck – Spanish roja
  • kohlrabi
  • lettuce mix
  • mesclun
  • okra
  • onions – sweet, white and red torpedo (an oblong, red onion)
  • peppers – red, yellow, orange, and purple bell peppers
  • potatoes: dark red norland (red-skinned, white interior) or satina (yellow skin and interior)
  • radish, French breakfast
  • scallions
  • Swiss chard
  • tomatoes – cherry (a mix of red, orange, yellow, purple, and maybe even some green)
  • tomatoes – red and heirloom and paste varieties

Bonus Herbs & Other things:
hot peppers including: fish, habanero, jalapeño, poblano, and anaheim peppers

Expected Harvest:

New this week:

a fresh harvest of kohlrabi – nice and tender and juicy
a second round of golden beets
(and we might even have some edamame… finally)

Plus more of…

  • arugula
  • beets – golden and red
  • green beans – French and yellow wax varieties
  • cabbage – white
  • carrots – orange
  • garlic, hardneck – Spanish roja
  • lettuce mix
  • okra
  • onions – sweet, white and red torpedo (an oblong, red onion)
  • mesclun
  • potatoes: dark red norland (red-skinned, white interior) or satina (yellow skin and interior)
  • radish, French breakfast
  • scallions
  • Swiss chard
  • tomatoes – cherry (a mix of red, orange, yellow, purple, and maybe even some green)
  • tomatoes – red and heirloom varieties
  • watermelon – quetzali (red flesh)

Bonus Herbs & Other things:

  • basil
  • hot peppers including: fish, habanero, jalapeño, poblano, and anaheim peppers

Future Harvests:

Soon we will have some baby bok choy that will be large enough to harvest.  We are also growing lemon grass again this year and will probably start harvesting that next week.

By Jmprouty. (Own work.) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)%5D, via Wikimedia CommonsDear beloved CSA members, we need to talk. We need to talk about a certain pod-shaped vegetable.

Dear beloved CSA members, we need to talk. We need to sit down for a second and just get a little real about a certain lime-green pod-shaped vegetable– because I know that you’re skeptical. In fact, know that skeptical is a kind word for what some of you are. Some of you are downright critical: you think it’s weird, or worse, slimy— and you’re right. Okra is unique, and it does have a unique texture to it, but you’re failing to see the incredible possibility that okra’s specific characteristic present. Okra’s token sliminess, for instance, comes by way of a natural thickener, which means that slicing up a handful of okra pods and throwing them into a soup or stew saves you the trouble of having to add flour or cornstarch to create a thick hearty base.

So, a story. Once, there was a farm apprentice named Aaron, and he thought that okra was the only vegetable he’d met and didn’t like (though, to be honest, he didn’t care much for lettuce either). He hated the slime. He didn’t understand the shape. He thought the texture was all wrong. He passed on the okra.

He had, however, heard tales of a preparation of okra that would magically transform it into a delicious and downright un-slimy food. But, alas, he did not have the will to deep-fry it against the wishes of health-conscious dinner companions. Aaron and okra were thus star-crossed, until one day, a wise and benevolent market customer suggested that tossing the okra in oil, salt, and pepper would yield the same magical effects. Aaron was, like you, skeptical, but he was of great courage and heart, and he attempted the spell. He made sure to remember to preheat the oven to 450 degrees and stir the okra occasionally.
And the okra was not slimy! It was tender on the inside and crispy on the outside! Its seeds were delicious pops of joy, and, behold! It was so versatile! It paired well with curries and indian spices but, oh lord, was it good just dipped in ketchup like the healthiest, coolest french-fry in the world. Aaron loved (loved! can you believe it?!) the okra. They were, as the story went, happily ever after.

And, here’s the deal, guys, okra is fresh, it’s local, and we have a lot of it that even we okra-loving farmers can’t eat fast enough. You can take the time to put in a gumbo (we’ve got a killer recipe for that too if you’d like it) or you can throw it in soups, but I dare every okra-hater out there to try roasting it this week, just this once, if only to prove that you are true of heart and taste.

Expected Harvest:

New this week:

  • arugula
  • mesclun, a colorful mix of Asian and mustard greens
  • French breakfast radish
Plus more of…
  • green beans – regular and yellow wax varieties
  • carrots – rainbow & orange
  • eggplant
  • garlic, hardneck – Spanish roja
  • lettuce mix
  • okra
  • onions – sweet, white and red torpedo (an oblong, red onion)
  • peppers – sweet bell (purple, orange, red, and yellow)
  • potatoes: dark red norland (red-skinned, white interior) or satina (yellow skin and interior)
  • scallions
  • Swiss chard
  • tomatoes – cherry (a mix of red, orange, yellow, purple, and maybe even some green)
  • tomatoes – red and heirloom varieties
  • watermelon – quetzali (red flesh)

Bonus Herbs & Other things:

  • basil
  • hot peppers including: fish, habanero, jalapeño, poblano, and anaheim peppers